News

Congratulations to the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) collaboration for being awarded the 2020 Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics. The citation reads: "For the first image of a supermassive black hole, taken by means of an Earth-sized alliance of telescopes."

Several UChicago researchers are involved in the EHT collaboration, and the 10 meter South Pole Telescope (SPT) is a critical component of the network of telescopes that make up the EHT. Chicagoland EHT collaboration members include Brad Benson, John Carlstrom, Tom Crawford, Jason Henning, Ryan Keisler, Erik Leitch, Daniel Michalik, Andrew Nadolski, Steve Padin, and Sasha Rahlin.

2020

Richard Miller, pioneer of computational astrophysics, 1926–2020

March 25, 2020


Meet Astronomy & Astrophysics student Amy Tang

March 10, 2020


“Scientists seize rare chance to watch faraway star system evolve”, by Sherry Landow, Phys.org

March 4, 2020

"Finding young planets is challenging. We really need to understand the behavior of the parent star to be able to find the shallow signals of these planets which can be overwhelmed by starspots and flares," says Adina Feinstein, a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow at the University of Chicago and co-author of the study.


“Leftover Big Bang light helps calculate how massive faraway galaxies are”, UChicago News

March 3, 2020

Fermilab, UChicago scientists tap South Pole Telescope data to shed light on universe

A team of scientists have demonstrated how to "weigh" galaxy clusters using light from the earliest moments of the universe - a new method that could help shed light on dark matter, dark energy and other mysteries of the cosmos, such as how the universe formed.


“New Solar Telescope Reveals Sun’s Surface in More Detail than Ever Before”, WTTW News

February 13, 2020

A new solar telescope in Hawaii has captured images of the sun unlike any seen before.  Professor Robert Rosner, an astrophysicist at the University of Chicago and one of the lead investigators on the project, says he’s been waiting for almost 40 years to see images like the ones recently captured.


“Prof. Eugene Parker wins prestigious Crafoord Prize in Astronomy”, UChicago News

January 30, 2020

Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences honors UChicago scientist’s pioneering work.
 


“2020 LAD Laboratory Astrophysics Prize Goes to James Truran”, AAS News

January 22, 2020

The Laboratory Astrophysics Division (LAD) of the American Astronomical Society (AAS) is awarding its 2020 Laboratory Astrophysics Prize to Dr. James Truran of the University of Chicago. This prize is given for his theoretical work on early star formation and the nucleosynthesis history of the universe, as well as for his seminal contributions to the study of astrophysical thermonuclear explosions, nucleosynthesis, and the use of nuclear-decay chronometers to determine ages of stellar and terrestrial matter.


“What will the next decade bring in science?”, UChicago News

January 9, 2020

"The most exciting thing is always something you haven't anticipated. In astronomy, whenever we've invented a new way to look at the sky, we discover something new that no one had ever thought of before. Our gravitational wave detectors haven't discovered anything profoundly unexpected, at least not yet."
- Daniel Holz, astrophysicist

 


NASA’s TESS spacecraft discovers its first habitable planet, first world with two stars

January 9, 2020

NASA’s TESS spacecraft discovers its first habitable planet, first world with two stars


2019

Parker Solar Probe’s first discoveries: Odd phenomena in space weather, solar wind

December 5, 2019

NASA mission named for pioneering UChicago scientist produces landmark research


Congratulations to Phil Mansfield

December 4, 2019

Phil Mansfield has been appoined as  the James Cronin Graduate Student Fellow.


Astronomers Propose a Novel Method of Finding Atmospheres on Rocky Worlds

December 2, 2019

When NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope launches in 2021, one of its most anticipated contributions to astronomy will be the study of exoplanets—planets orbiting distant stars. Among the most pressing questions in exoplanet science is: Can a small, rocky exoplanet orbiting close to a red dwarf star hold onto an atmosphere?

In a series of four papers in the Astrophysical Journal, a team of astronomers proposes a new method of using Webb to determine whether a rocky exoplanet has an atmosphere. The technique, which involves measuring the planet’s temperature as it passes behind its star and then comes back into view, is significantly faster than more traditional methods of atmospheric detection like transmission spectroscopy.

“We find that Webb could easily infer the presence or absence of an atmosphere around a dozen known rocky exoplanets with less than 10 hours of observing time per planet,” said Jacob Bean of the University of Chicago, a co-author on three of the papers.


Prof. Jacob Bean is the science team lead for the new CASE mission

November 14, 2019

Congratulations to UChicago Astronomy & Astrophysics Professor Jacob Bean, who is the new NASA science team lead for CASE!

NASA will contribute an instrument to a European space mission to explore the atmospheres of hundreds of exoplanets.

The instrument, called the Contribution to ARIEL Spectroscopy of Exoplanets, or CASE, adds scientific capabilities to ESA's Atmospheric Remote-sensing Infrared Exoplanet Large-survey, or ARIEL, mission.


Mining historical glass slides for astronomical data

November 6, 2019

A test image from the pilot study on mining astronomical data from historical glass slides.


Nearly a decade in the making, exoplanet-hunting instrument installed in Hawaii

October 2, 2019

MAROON-X team members and Gemini Observatory staff standing in front of the Gemini North telescope with the MAROON-X unit.